10 More Smart Words to Use at Work Right Now [Part 2]

10 More Smart Words to Use at Work Right Now [Part 2]

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Hey, it’s Annemarie with
Speak Confident English. Back in July I did a lesson on 10 smart
words to use at work and it immediately became the most popular lesson
that we have here on YouTube. So because I know that you love that kind
of lesson and I know that you want to have a variety of language that will
allow you to communicate professionally, sound confident and clear in your
English and be able to respond to any situation with the right vocabulary. I want to give you 10 more smart words
that you can be using at work today. And at the very end, I’m going to share
with you my favorite word on this list. The reason I love it is it
takes this really complex idea, this complex feeling that we all have, and it makes it super simple. So be
sure to stick with me to the end. All right. Before we start with our list
for today, I want to clarify one thing: When I did the last lesson, I noticed that a lot of people tried to
use all of the different words that I shared in one example sentence
or in a couple of sentences, and I want to caution you, these words are best used sparingly. What that means is to only
use them occasionally. If you listen carefully to native
speakers, including myself, you’ll notice that in
spoken communication, we actually keep our language very simple. When someone uses too many idioms
or too many high level words, too much advanced vocabulary, it doesn’t sound natural and sometimes
they even sound a little bit arrogant and I don’t want you to do that. So the words that I’m going to share
with you today are fantastic for growing your vocabulary and giving you a
variety of words that you can use: Both a combination of simple everyday
language and these more high-level complex words. But again, I want you
to just use them sometimes, not all the time and
not in every sentence. And that is the perfect introduction
for our first word today, which is the word adept. Adept means that someone
is highly skilled, they’re an expert or they’re well trained
in something very specific and for an example I want to help you become more
adept in your English speaking skills. Number two is the word ambivalent and
this is a word I actually use a lot because it’s often true for
me. When you are ambivalent, you are uncertain between two options
usually because you have conflicting or contradictory emotions about something
or you really just don’t care. Here’s a super common example in
my house. My husband might ask me, what do you want for dinner, Italian
or Korean? And I’ll say, hmm, either one. I’m pretty ambivalent.
In other words, I don’t really care. They both sound good. Number three is to deviate, which means to stray or go off course
you’re going away from the plan. In a business meeting you
might hear someone say, the deadline for this is tomorrow, so now is really not the time
to deviate from our strategy. Let’s stick with the plan and then we
can reevaluate once we meet the deadline. Number four fiasco. I love
the way that this word sounds. If something is a total
fiasco, it’s a complete, utter failure. It’s chaos, it’s messy, everything went wrong. This is definitely something you
probably want to avoid at work. You don’t want things to become a fiasco, but sometimes they happen.
For example, you might say, this partnership has become an absolute
fiasco. It’s time to give it up. Number five is another really
fun one. Flabbergasted. Have you heard that one
before? Flabbergasted. If you walk into work tomorrow and your
boss asks you to come into the office and immediately gives you a promotion
that you can’t believe and a great pay raise, you probably would feel
a little bit flabbergasted. You would be surprised, astonished, and even a little bit
speechless. Another example, I was flabbergasted watching him
explode at the meeting yesterday. That was absolutely
inappropriate. Number six, impeccable. Impeccable is flawless. There are no errors, no mistakes. Everything is perfect and in line, it’s a great word to use in
compliments. For example, you might know someone who
is an impeccable dresser, which means they always
look perfectly put together. Their clothing is smart, it looks great and it
fits them really well. You might know someone who’s
an impeccable presenter, lecturer or public speaker,
they speak flawlessly. Seven is another great one. Honestly,
this list today is so much fun. Number seven is the word kibosh. To put the kibosh on something means
to put a stop to it immediately. For example, if you have a strategic plan and you
start to deviate from that strategic plan and as a result it creates a fiasco. You might need to put the kibosh
on it. Number eight: egalitarian have you heard this one before? What
do you think it means? Egalitarian. It means that everything is equal
or there is equality for all people. I recently heard someone describe their
workplace as an egalitarian workplace and I asked them, why is your workplace
egalitarian? And they said, well, we’re all on a first name basis. It’s hard to know who the boss really
is. We all have the same office. There isn’t any status in our office. What do you think about that? Would you want to work in
an office place like that? Share your thoughts in the comments below, but now let’s move on to the next one. Number nine is zealous. Zealous means to be
enthusiastic about something. Sometimes even so enthusiastic
that it becomes fanatical. You become a fanatic about something. Do you know anybody who is
a zealous public speaker? They’re the kind of speaker that gets
everyone excited and energizes the audience or do you know anyone who’s
really zealous about following the rules? They want to do everything
exactly right. And finally, we’re at number 10 my favorite on
today’s list because it takes this really complex idea and it expresses it perfectly
in a small expression that combines one word and one number. It is actually the title of a book that
was written in 1961 by Joseph Heller. The book is Catch-22. Have you ever heard
this expression before? It’s a Catch-22 or I’m
in a Catch-22 situation. What this expression means or what it
describes are those situations when there is no good option, there’s no escape. You have to make a choice, but none
of the choices are good choices. There is no winning here. In English, we have an idiom that means the same
thing to be between a rock and a hard place. Or you’ll also hear
people say something like, damned if you do, damned
if you don’t. Again, there’s no good option. Here’s
a really simple example. I’m in a bit of a Catch-22. I can’t find anyone to
cover my shift at work, but if I cancel my doctor’s appointment, I can’t get another one for two
months. I don’t know what to do. I’m totally stuck. As you
can see in that situation, there’s no escape.
There’s two bad choices, and at the end of the day you’ve
got to make, it’s a Catch-22 now you’ve got 10 more
smart words to use at work, so it’s time to put them
into practice. Of course, my two favorite words on this list
are Catch-22 in flabbergasted. So my first question is, have you ever been in
a Catch-22 situation? What was it and what did you do? Tell me about it in the comments
and be sure to use Catch-22. The second thing I want you to do is
choose your favorite new word from this list and use it in your own example. Doing that will help you immediately add
it to your vocabulary so that you can start to use it in daily
conversation. With that, thank you so much for joining
me. If you loved this lesson, be sure to give it a thumbs up on YouTube
and subscribe to this channel so you never miss a future lesson. You can also share it with friends or
colleagues on Facebook or by email. And finally, if you missed it, be sure to check out the first
video I had on this topic, which I shared in July, and I’ll give
you a link to it in the notes below. Have a fantastic week and I’ll see you
next time for your Confident English lesson.

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